People

Michelle Ann Abate is Associate Professor of Literature for Children and Young Adults at The Ohio State University.  Michelle has published articles on comics and graphic novels in Jeunesse and The Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics.   With Karly Marie Grice, Michelle co-curated the exhibit “ ‘Good Grief!’: Children and Comics,” which was on display at The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum in Summer 2016.  The exhibit was accompanied by a collection of catalogue essays, titled “Children’s Comics, Past and Present,” which Michelle co-edited with Joe Sutliff Sanders.  Finally, with Gwen Athene Tarbox, Michelle co-edited Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults: A Collection of Critical Essays.  The book will be released from the University of Mississippi Press in Spring 2017.

 

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Frederick Luis Aldama University Distinguished Scholar as well as Arts & Humanities Distinguished Professor at The Ohio State University. His work in Comics Studies includes his mixed comic/flash-fiction collection Long Stories Cut Short: Fictions from the Borderlands (2017), The Routledge Companion to Latino/a Pop Culture, Graphic Borders: Latino Comic Books Past, Present, and Future (2016), Latinx Comic Book Storytelling: An Odyssey by Interview (2016), ¡Muy Pop! Conversations on Latino Popular Culture (2013), Multicultural Comics: From Zap to Blue Beetle (2010), and Your Brain on Latino Comics  (2009). In this area of scholarly inquiry he serves as co-editor of two book series, Latinx Pop Culture (University of Arizona) and World Comics and Graphic Nonfiction (University of Texas Press). He is also editor of the trade-book graphic novel and nonfiction series, Latinographix (Ohio State University Press). In the spring of 2017 he is launching the Online Encyclopedia of World Comics.

 

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Erin Kathleen Bahl is a doctoral candidate in the English department at the Ohio State University studying digital media, composition, and folklore.  Her research investigates the possibilities that new media and digital technologies offer for creating knowledge and telling stories (including comics!). Her work has been published in Composition Studies, Humanities Journal, Harlot of the Arts, Signs and Media, and Showcasing the Best of CIWIC/DMAC, with forthcoming work in Computers and Composition Online and Computers and Composition Digital Press. She is also working up the courage to experiment with her own digital comics, which can be found in The Nashville Review (Nr. 20) and Through the Twisted Woods (forthcoming).

 

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Michelle Cohen is a PhD candidate in the English Department specializing in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies. Her work focuses on multimodal composition, art practices, and visual rhetoric, using comics as a site of research. Currently, her dissertation specifically examines the ways in which visual stylistics in comics can inform definitions of style in composition pedagogy.

 

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Corey Efron is a PhD candidate in the English department at The Ohio State University. As a media comparativist, Corey is interested in the affordances of different narrative media. Particularly, Corey focuses on post-1945 experimental fiction and its relationship to other media, such as film, television, and comics. Corey is working on a dissertation in which he examines the way fiction has looked to other media as an impetus to experiment with temporality. Regarding comics, Corey enjoys their ability to represent time differently than any other medium.

 

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Margaret C. Flinn is an Associate Professor in the Department of French and Italian and Director of Graduate Studies of the Film Studies Program. She regularly teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on French-language animation and bande dessinée, and a freshman seminar on “High and Low? Art and Popular Culture,” which focuses on film and comics. Her publications in comics studies include articles on a bande dessinée series commissioned by the Louvre museum and on the French artist Farid Boudjellal. Upcoming work and classes will focus on documentary comics.

 

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Jared Gardner is a Professor in the English Department and director of the Popular Culture Studies program. His past work in Comics Studies includes Projections: The History of 21st-Century Storytelling (Stanford UP, 2012) and editorial work with the Library of American Comics (IDW). He is currently editor of Inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society and is working on a monograph on comics, time and medicine, tentatively titled “Patient Time.” He regularly teaches classes on newspaper and comic book history and on the contemporary graphic novel.

 

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Torsa Ghosal is a PhD candidate in the English department. Her dissertation analyzes contemporary multimodal literature. Her research interests include Anglophone comics, films, and popular culture from North America, the UK, and South Asia. She has published about graphic novels such as Chris Ware’s Building Stories and Malik Sajad’s Munnu: a boy from Kashmir in the journals Storyworlds and South Asian Popular Culture. Currently, in the capacity of an associate editor of Papercuts, a South Asian literary magazine, she is actively involved in commissioning comics and multimodal narratives addressing contemporary South Asian culture and politics.

 

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Karly Marie Grice is a doctoral candidate in Education: Teaching & Learning at The Ohio State University. She teaches undergraduate children’s literature courses emphasizing multicultural texts and graphic narratives. Her research includes comics, graphic narratology, visual culture, and multicultural children’s literature. Her dissertation focuses on combining critical theories and a contextual graphic narratology in order to analyze children’s and young adult comics for their messages on social justice issues. She has a published article on Sara Varon’s Robot Dreams as graphic medicine and a post-colonial/new historicist reading of Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers & Saints. She also co-curated the comics exhibit “‘Good Grief!’: Children and Comics” at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum with Michelle Ann Abate.

 

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Lindsay Hodgens is an MA/PhD student in the English department at The Ohio State University. Her research focuses primarily on representations of space in comics, video games, and contemporary American literature. Other research interests include visual poetry, representations of museums in popular culture, and vernacular representations of traumatic space (with special attention to the damage caused by the 1998 and 2011 tornadoes in Oak Grove, Alabama).

 

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Christopher Jeansonne is a doctoral student in the Department of Arts Administration, Education, and Policy. Having taught comics in both media production and media studies programs at the K-12 and university level, Chris is interested comics as a particularly fruitful medium through which to explore multimodal media pedagogy practices. At various conferences, he has presented on George Herriman’s Krazy Kat, on superheroes in the classroom, and on text-to-comic adaptations. He is currently working on a dissertation that examines the use of superheroes as a transmedial focus for self-reflexive, community-based, student-led classroom practices. 

 
 

Caitlin McGurk is the Associate Curator for Outreach & Engagement as well as an Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, the largest collection of comics and cartoon art in the world. She leads the comics history and education efforts at the library, as well as all publicity, community outreach, and exhibit curation. Caitlin has also worked for The Center for Cartoon Studies’ Schulz Library, the Bulliet Comics Collection of Columbia University, and Marvel Comics. She has written for Diamond Comics Bookshelf magazine for educators and librarians, published her own comics, serves on the council for Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) and as a juror for the Thurber House Graphic Novelist Residency Program. Her primary research interests include early women cartoonists, underground comix, alternative comics, and comics as educational tools. She currently serves as Associate Editor for the “From The Field” section of Inks.
 

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Rachel Miller is a PhD candidate in the English department who loves to read, think, and write about comics made by girls and women. Her dissertation considers how teen girl culture -- from diary making to Riot Grrrrl to Girl Power -- might help us rethink the relationship between time, literary history, the archive and comics in the 1990s and beyond. She is also currently designing and executing a series of workshops on comics writing for both artists and writers. She is the secretary-treasurer for the Graduate Caucus of the Comics Studies Society and Assistant Editor for Inks. In her spare time, she hangs out with her pug, Wallace, and writes a blog about current comics written by girls and women (trashqueens.wordpress.com).

 

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Alison Monaghan is a PhD student in the English department. Her work focuses on the intersections of comics and graphic novels, medical humanities, and life-writing. Her most recent projects have examined the evolution and shaping of breast cancer narratives and taken up fictionality in representations of illness experiences. She has an article forthcoming about truth claims in narratives of mental illness aimed at teenagers.  She is the former Secretary-Treasurer of the Graduate Caucus of the Comics Studies Society.

 

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Danielle Orozco received her BA in English from California State University, Northridge and is currently working on her MA at the Ohio State University. Her research interests include Pop Culture & Film with a focus on US ethnic studies. By examining twentieth and twenty-first century sociohistorical and political culture, she hopes to explore the ways in which national rhetoric has influenced cultural ideas about race, citizenship, and identity.

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Ben Owen is a PhD candidate in the English department. His dissertation explores the reciprocal influence of cartooning and conceptual art in the US during the first half of the 20th century. The project involves looking at a lot of newspaper and magazine comics from the period, including work by Rube Goldberg, George Herriman, Crockett Johnson, Saul Steinberg, and Ernie Bushmiller. He has published on the philosophy of history and its relationship to comics form in Joe Sacco’s Footnotes in Gaza, and has a forthcoming essay examining A Charlie Brown Christmas and the legacy of the cartoon modern style. He is former president of the Graduate Caucus of the Comics Studies Society, and current Book Review Editor for Inks.

 

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Rocio Isabel Prado is a PhD student in the English department who focuses on comedy, sexuality, race, and comics. Her current research concerns the subversive techniques of queer and hetero Latina comics artists in response to fan culture and political events. When she isn’t researching or grading she is busy obsessively forming opinions on comedy and pop culture that she really should make into a blog or podcast someday.

 

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Jenny Robb is Curator and Associate Professor of The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, the largest academic research institution dedicated to cartoons and comics.  Before coming to Ohio State in 2005, she served as Curator of the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco for 5 years.   She holds masters degrees in History and Museum Studies from Syracuse University.  Robb has curated numerous cartoon and comics exhibitions, including, most recently, Exploring Calvin and Hobbes and Dedini: The Art of Humor.  She is the author of several comics-related articles including “Bill Blackbeard: the Collector Who Rescued the Comics” in the Journal of American Culture and “From the Periodical Archives: Winsor McCay, George Randolph Chester and the Tale of the Jungle Imps” published in American Periodicals: A Journal of History, Criticism, & Bibliography.  

 

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Cathy Ryan is a faculty member in the English Department whose research interests include teaching a new course on visual narrative and precursors to the graphic novel. She and co-author Christiane Buuck's chapter, “Looking Beyond the Scenes: Spatial Storytelling and Masking in Shaun Tan's ‘The Arrival’,” will soon be published in Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults, Eds. Michelle Abate and Gwen Athene Tarbox (University of Mississippi Press, Spring 2017). She was founder and Director, Media Lab (Fisher College of Business; 1998 – 2000) and a founding member of the Digital Arts and Humanities Working Group, The Ohio State University < https://huminst.osu.edu/digital-arts-and-humanities >. She dreams about hosting a talk (and curated exhibit) with both the film producer and composer of the 50th Anniversary commemorative short film of Si Lewen's "The Parade" and to curate an exhibition displaying the ways students interact in words with images from Giacomo Patri's novel in linocuts, "White Collar." She is a member of The Comics Studies Society. Current interests include sound mapping, teaching wordless graphic novels, and mucking about in the creative worlds of Shaun Tan.

 

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Christine N. Stamper is a PhD student at the Ohio State University with a specialization in Literature for Children and Young Adults. Her research interests include young adult literature, representations of LGBTQ populations, gender, and graphic narratives. She presented a paper about contemporary representations of the Hatter at Cambridge’s conference celebrating the 150th anniversary of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (2015). With Rob Bittner and Jennifer Ingrey, she published “Queer and trans-themed books for young readers: a critical review” for Discourse (2016).

 

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Evan Van Tassell is an MA/PhD student in the English department. His comics interests include the formal components of comics reading; issues of focalization and graphiation; and the application of comics studies to a wider range of iconic and site-specific artwork. More broadly, he studies contemporary multimodal narrative, narrative theory, and popular culture. He also writes and draws his own amateur comics art.

 

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Robyn Warhol is Arts & Humanities Distinguished Professor and Interim Chair of English at OSU.  Among other specialties (narrative theory, feminist theory, women writers, Victorian novel), she teaches Graphic Memoir and has published on Bechdel’s Fun Home.  Her books include Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feeling and Popular Forms  (OSUP, 2003) and Gendered Interventions: Narrative Discourse in the Victorian Novel (Rutgers UP, 1989), an early work of feminist narratology which explicates her model of the “engaging narrator.”  As a feminist narratologist, Warhol studies the interrelations between gender and narrative forms.  She is known among feminist scholars as the co-editor (with Diane Price Herndl) of Feminisms: An Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism (1991, 1997) and its successor, Feminisms Redux (2009).  Her two most recent books won international awards: Love Among the Archives: Writing the Lives of Sir George Scharf, Victorian Bachelor, co-authored by Helena Michie  (Edinburgh UP, 2015) won the NAVSA prize for Best Book of the Year and Narrative Theory Unbound: Queer and Feminist Interventions, co-edited by Susan S. Lanser (OSUP, 2015) won honorable mention (2nd prize) for the Perkins Prize for best book in narrative.  

 

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Joshua Zirl is a PhD student in the English department who is focused on identity and representation in comics.  His primary interests are in early horror and contemporary superhero comics, but he is currently working on an essay about the character Sanjak from Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates strip, the earliest example of a lesbian character in mainstream newspaper comics.  His other areas of inquiry are comprised of a complex web of videogames, narrative, identification, and illusions of choice.

 

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